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CBF grants FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions

Application process

Assessment Process

Grant processes

Application form specifics – both grant categories

Development & Operations grants

Content grants

Support for Specialist Radio Programming

Definitions

Previous Grant categories

Other


Application process

What grants are available?

There are two grant categories that stations will apply for:

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When do I apply?

There are two grant rounds in the year.  Organisations are encouraged to apply for support for the up-coming financial year early in the calendar year, and then there is a second opportunity to seek support for needs that have arising in the meantime in the second half of the calendar year.

For the next grant round closing dates, see our key dates page.

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How do I apply?

Firstly, read the grant guidelines for the two grant categories: Development & Operations grants and Content grants. Make sure you’re eligible to apply. The grant guidelines are available on the CBF website on the ‘Grants’ page.

Then make a plan outlining your organisation’s various funding requests. These can be specific projects or programs (e.g. addition of shopfront to station website, continuation of a weekly environmental program, station open day), infrastructure requirements (e.g. studio equipment upgrade, transmission site relocation) and/or operational expenses (e.g. salaries, electricity for transmission site, MYOB software).

Once you have established what you need, split up your list into the two categories your requests relate to: Development & Operations or Content.

Applications are managed through the SmartyGrants system. To start your application, go to the ‘Grants’ page on the CBF website. Select the grant category you would like to begin with (either Development & Operations grants or Content grants) and read through the information provided. It’s a good idea at this point to give one of the Grants Administrators a call to check that your ideas match up with the grant objectives before you start filling out the application form.

You can preview the application form on our website to get an idea of any attachments or information you may need to collect before you start the application, such as your station’s strategic plan, quotes, financial reports…

You will be asked to complete a summary of each application (Development & Operations and/or Content) and then you can attach any number of project details descriptions to your application summary, outlining the specifics of each project you’re requesting funding for.

Get started with the summary. Fill out your contact details and the overview information about your organisation. For Development & Operations applications, the summary area is also where you will request support for any operational expenses. On the last page of the summary form you will be asked to list all of the projects you’re requesting funding for in order of priority to your organisation. You can come back to this page of your summary form once you have completed the project details.

Save and close your Summary form – don’t submit it yet!  From the ‘My Submissions’ page in SmartGrants you will see some options under the Summary form ‘in progress’.

Add project details to your summary form. You will need to fill out the details of each project separately, except for infrastructure requests which can be bundled up together and specialist radio programming details, which will outline all Indigenous, RPH and Ethnic programs in one details form.

Once you’ve completed the project details for each activity/program click ‘submit’ on the project details forms. Then go back to your summary and list them in order of priority to your organisation. Check back over your summary form to make sure you’ve included all the information requested and click ‘submit’ on each of the summary and project details one-by-one.

You can save your application progress and come back to various parts, but make sure you click ‘submit’ on all of the projects you want to apply for in each round.

In concept, the whole process looks like this:

grant-application-process.jpg

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Why have separate summary and project details sections of the application?

The summary and project details allows the CBF to give Grants Advisory Committees an overview of the station’s application request and to group projects as ‘like with like’ for assessment purposes. We’ll be distributing your applications, or parts of applications to different assessors. This will be a lot of reading for our volunteers, so depending on the number of applications Grants Administrators will group similar requests together on the basis of project type, amount requested or appropriate assessor requirements (i.e. TV program project details, infrastructure requests over $30,000, Indigenous program requests).

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Assessment process

When will I find out the outcome of my application?

For Round 1 applications closing in late March / early April, you will receive notice of the outcome of your application in late May.  All grants allocated in May will be published on the CBF website in early June.

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When will the grant be paid?

Round 1 grants will be paid from late July 2017.  Make sure your organisation has all prior grant reporting up-to-date – organisations with overdue grant reporting will not be paid until those reports are accepted.  Grants are held for a period of eight weeks, after which grants may be withdrawn and funds reallocated.

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How do the priority weightings work?

In order to attempt to address inequities in the community broadcasting sector and the broader community, mechanisms have been introduced to minimise the disadvantage that low resource and/or regional stations may experience through competitive grant application processes.

In 2017, the mechanism being trialled is priority loadings to be applied to assessment scores.  This ‘score bump’ of 5% will be added to the assessment score for stations organisations in regional and rural areas and organisations with limited capacity to fund initiatives (we have defined this as organisations with an average annual income less than $100,000 over the past 3 years).  Organisations can qualify for both loadings.

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Will the priority weightings change in future years?

The CBF will analyse the effect of the priority loadings applied to scores to determine how the mechanism can be refined in future years.  Different mechanisms to address inequities that exist in a competitive grants processes may be tested in future years. 

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Does ‘regional’ include rural?

Yes, under the CBF grant guidelines regional and rural terminology is interchangeable. Priority weightings will attributed to aggregated assessment scores on the basis of ACMA licensing definitions, which no longer include a specification for ‘rural’ license types. The CBF will follow ACMA’s definition of metropolitan, regional and remote broadcast licenses and will apply the ‘score bump’ of 5% to regional licensed applicants for stations and on the basis of postcode for other eligible organisations incorporated in regional areas.

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Does ‘regional’ include remote?

No, it doesn’t. Support for remote broadcast services is provided through the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet’s Indigenous Advancement Strategy.

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Why is there a question about suggesting assessors in the application form?

Applicants may feel that their project proposals will be best understood by assessors with a particular cultural background, experience-base or skill set. This question allows applicants to identify where this is the case, just in case it’s not obvious in the rest of your application.

The CBF is committed to principles of self-determination and will assign Indigenous assessors and assessors who have completed relevant cultural competency training to assess all Indigenous grant projects.

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How will the application be assessed?

Competitive grants are assessed against the criteria detailed in the grant guidelines and on the basis of the list of factors that the Grants Advisory Committee will consider when making grant recommendations - check the relevant grant guidelines for further information.

The CBF uses a peer review assessment process to determine funding allocations. This means that the people assessing your application have experience in the community broadcasting sector and bring their own set of expertise to reviewing your application.

Below is a visual representation of the assessment to allocation process for Content and Development & Operations grants:

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Grant processes

How will grant reporting work when there are lots of components to each grant application?

The Grant Agreement will describe each activity that is being funded with details on the timeline and what your report for that activity should include. We want to hear about the highs and lows of your activities - what worked, what didn’t, and the impact of the activity on your station and community. 

In particular we want to know how you have met the objective of the grant category.

You can report on any funded activity or activities as you complete them during the period, or wait until the report due date.  For longer term projects we may request a progress report so we know you are keeping to the schedule outlined in the Agreement.

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How will multi-year funding work?

In each project details form you will have the option to indicate if you would like the project to be considered for multi-year funding. If you select ‘yes’, Grants Advisory Committees may invite you to provide a more detailed budget for multiple years and an extended project plan.

Should your request for multi-year funding be approved, the grant agreement will detail a schedule of payment instalments appropriate to your project timeline and approved grant budget. The payment of scheduled instalments will be contingent on the provision of project progress reports, as described in your grant agreement.

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In the past there were some restrictions about how often we could apply for particular categories (e.g. under the former General Station grants you could receive salary support once every two years).  Are there any restrictions like that under the new categories?

Restrictions around how often an organisation can receive funding support for salaried positions have been removed, however available funds have not increased. Applicants can request salary subsidy support in consecutive years and funds will flow to where they’re needed most. In a funding climate where demand always exceeds funds available, this may mean some tough decisions for CBF Grants Advisory Committees as it’s unlikely that we will be able to provide funds for all salary requests. However you are welcome to make a case for salary support in multiple years if your organisation can demonstrate a need for consecutive year support.

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What is required to report on the grant?

If your application is successful there will be information about how to report on the grant in your Grant Agreement.

Your grant report will include a description of what the outcomes of the grant were, a financial report that shows how the grant was spent and a statement certifying that the grant was spent according to the terms of the Grant Agreement.  Some grantees are required to provide certification by an auditor.  For more information, see Grant Reporting Requirements.

Successful applicants are reminded that grant funds can only be used for the purpose specified within your grant agreement. Any variation to that purpose must receive written agreement from the Foundation beforehand. Your management of CBF grant funding must meet all the conditions set out in your grant agreement. Refer to our summary of CBF Grant Reporting requirements and your grant agreement for further information.

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When will we need to report on the grant?

Your final report for a funded activity will be due 3 months after the end of the Funded Activity Period which in many cases will be based on the timeline you have identified in your grant application.  For example, if you are funded to replace your main transmitter and you anticipate you can finish that by December 2017, your Funded Activity Period may be July to December 2017, with final report due March 2018.  If you receive a grant to produce content for the entire year, the funded activity will be July 2017 to June 2018, with final report due September 2018.

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Application form specifics – both grant categories

How do I prioritise my projects?

This is a conversation worth having within your organisation. Of all the things you’re requesting funding for, which are vital right now and which are future projects? Does your organisation’s strategic plan give you some guidance about the key priorities of your organisation?

The order in which you list projects will help Grants Advisory Committees make funding recommendations about funding for your organisation when faced with limited available funds on the basis of what’s most important to you. If you don’t set your own priorities, the Grants Advisory Committees will make recommendations based on the Committee’s evaluation of priority for each of the projects in your application.

The priorities you set will be taken in to account, but you may be funded a proposal that is not your first priority.  This may be due to funds being available for specific purposes, or one of your lower priority proposals more closely meeting the grant category objectives and assessment criteria.

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Why are some sections of the application form grey?

Some sections of the application form may appear in a faded grey and you won’t be able to type information into the response boxes for questions in that section. The application forms have ‘conditional logic’, which means that you will only need to complete that section of the form if you have responded a particular way to an earlier question.

If a section of the form is greyed out, just skip past it because it means you don’t need to complete that section based on your answers earlier in the form.  Alternatively, check back over your responses to earlier questions to make sure you didn’t miss a question that is relevant to your application.

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How do I complete the budget table?

Each grant application requires a budget for your operational support requests and individual project budgets, so completing the budget is very important.

A detailed description of how to complete the budget table in the application form

The budget should give an overview of the total costs for the project, not just the amount you’re asking the CBF to contribute. Make sure you list all items required for the project, even if they’re provided in-kind or paid for by the station. This will show assessors that you have a plan to cover anything the CBF grant is not covering.

Looking at the table from left to right:

  • A drop down list of potential expenditure items is provided in the first column of the budget table. Select the most appropriate one for each item in your budget, or if none of them suit your purpose, select ‘other’.
  • The ‘item detail’ column is where you describe exactly what you need. For example, if you have selected ‘phone/internet costs’ in the expenditure item column, the item detail column might say ‘$80 per month for 12 months’.
  • The ‘total cost’ column should show the total amount you will be required to spend for the project or throughout the year. What is the actual cost of this item?
  • Then describe how much you would like the CBF to contribute to the total cost in the ‘CBF grant funds’ column. This might be the whole amount, or part of the amount, or nothing for this line item.
  • If you’re not asking the CBF to pay for all of the line item, tell us how much is left to pay for in the ‘other funds’ column. Again, this might be a partial amount, or the total cost of the item for things you don’t need the CBF to cover.
  • If you have indicated a contribution of ‘other funds’ in the other funds column, you should identify who will be contributing that money in the ‘contributor of other funds’ column on the right hand side of the table. The contributor of the funds might be the station, or another funding body, or by a fundraising initiative. This is an opportunity for you to demonstrate a contribution to the project.

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Do I have to provide supporting documents?

Your application will be stronger if you attach documents that help demonstrate evidence of need, evidence of partnerships, project planning through detailed documentation such as program run sheets each help assessors understand your proposal more clearly. In most cases this is not compulsory, just useful, particularly for larger requests.  Check the section of the grant guidelines titled 'what should you include in the application?'.

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What if we don't have a strategic plan?

Apply for help to get one! Our application forms ask you to attach a strategic plan, but we recognise that not all organisations have an up-to-date strategic plan in action. If that’s the case for your organisation, you can request funding assistance to undertake a planning process as a Development Project in your Development & Operations grant application.

Grant funds might be used to help your organisation access a facilitator to guide this process, to cover meeting expenses, printed materials or implementation resources to help get planning documents together to help guide your organisation. Then you’ll be better placed to connect your grant application with your new strategic plan in the next grant round.

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Development & Operations grants

How much should we apply for?

You should apply for what you need to continue doing the good work you are already undertaking and also for start-up funds for new ideas. 

As part of your core operational support request, you should consider applying for what it costs you for: all your transmission costs for primary and secondary/translator sites (site rental, electricity at the transmission site/s, ongoing studio to transmitter linking costs if you do not use a microwave link); salary subsidies for key personnel and technical support (be aware it is unlikely we will cover the full cost of wages and on-costs); costs associated with your financial management such as accountant and auditor services.  For Infrastructure requests, include the cost of the equipment, freight, installation and testing. For project requests, ask for what you need while keeping in mind any requirements to do with other funding contributions.

Applicants producing ethnic programs* are encouraged to apply for the following minimum application levels for support for core operations:

  • Stations broadcasting 1 or less hours of eligible ethnic programs per week should apply for at least $2,000
  • 2–5 hrs at least $5,000
  • 6–10 hrs at least $10,000
  • 11–20 hrs at least $20,000
  • 21–30 hrs at least $30,000
  • 31–50 hrs at least $40,000
  • 50+ hours at least $70,000
  • There is no recommended minimum application level for full-time ethnic stations.

*Ethnic programs are programs that are eligible for Specialist Radio Programming support through Content grants

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Are some activities prioritised over others?

Some prioritisation of activities is expected to depend on available funds for certain activities, as defined by CBF funding providers. See What funding is available?

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What funding is available?

The Department of Communications and Arts allocates funds to the CBF to support some particular activities. There are dedicated funds to support:

  • Transmission expenses
  • Indigenous broadcasting
  • Ethnic broadcasting
  • RPH broadcasting
  • General broadcasting and training

Accordingly, this funding will be allocated to support activities that fall under those objectives. For example, stations broadcasting weekly ethnic programs may be allocated funds from available ethnic broadcasting funds.

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What is meant by membership fees?

Membership fees refers to organisational and individual memberships of other organisations. It is expected that broadcasters will self-fund membership to relevant organisations such as CBAA membership fees, NEMBC membership, the Funding Centre membership, relevant industry unions.

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What do the stages in the project timeline mean?

The project timeline table asks you to identify the when, what, how and who of your project plan.

A dropdown list of potential stages is provided to help guide this process. Below is an explanation of what we mean by each of the stages:

Already completed – things you have done prior to this application, eg. researched equipment supplier options, met with project partners, gained approval for site access.

Planning – things you still need to do before this project can begin, eg. meetings, event promotion, recruit personnel, develop training resources.

Implementation – details about what you need to do to actually carry out the project, eg. purchase equipment, install equipment, conference event, conduct training.

Evaluation – things you will do after the project is completed to establish whether it was a success or not, eg. collect feedback, survey listeners in new area via social media, take photos of presenters using newly installed equipment.

Other – does something about your project plan not fit into the definitions above? Use the ‘other’ option and make sure the activity is described in detail in the next column over.

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What happens if we don’t supply three quotes for Infrastructure requests?

Your application will most likely receive a lower score against the Implementation assessment criteria if you have few than three quotes for each piece of equipment you want to purchase, because it signals you have not demonstrated clear planning for the activity.

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Are basics like studio rent/power and insurance considered operational support?  And if so, should the station submit previous invoices with the application?

Yes, those basics can qualify for support through a Development & Operations grant.  You can apply for support for any expenses that your station has – but you’ll need to describe in the application what you are requesting support for and why your organisation needs it.

You are not required to attach previous invoices to qualify for support, but in some circumstances, it may strengthen your application to show evidence of particular costs, especially if they are unusual or provide context for what you are requesting.  You will already be attaching your most recent audited financial statements with your application which may provide us with some context for your request. We don't want you to upload dozens of bills in order to demonstrate that you have basic operational costs - but it is helpful if you provide some supporting documentation for any expected increases to your costs or reasoning for why you need help with a particular request.

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Can we apply for funds to keep just in case some equipment breaks down and needs replacing unexpectedly?

The failure of some equipment may be difficult to predict which is why there's a second grant round planned for each financial year to give applicants the opportunity to request funds for equipment that may have failed without notice. As per our previous grant structure, this does mean that a station may need to borrow equipment or use back-up equipment in between grant rounds. We would encourage stations to develop a cash reserve for equipment emergencies wherever possible through your own income-generation. While it's good practice for stations to have back-up equipment, it's unlikely that CBF funds can extend to providing backup equipment for all broadcasting organisations or all equipment items. It will be important to try to plan as much as possible in considering equipment attrition.

The CBF’s Emergency Grants continue to be available to support stations to replace damaged or destroyed essential equipment in order to restore basic transmission following an unforeseen event. You can apply for an Emergency Grant at any time, but it’s best to contact us in the first instance to check whether your circumstances qualify. 

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Where can we get advice about which equipment is best for us?

Technorama, with the support of the Community Broadcasting Association of Australia, has set up a Facebook group for community broadcasters to ask questions about technology. 

> Join the group, post a question and the hive of the sector's best technological minds will answer.

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Could we employ a full-time Station Manager totally sourced from an annual grant?

Remember that funds are limited. You can request funding support for the full amount of an annual salary if that’s a need within your station, but keep in mind that Grants Advisory Committees will be balancing such salary requests against other station needs such as equipment and the funding priorities in the Development & Operations grant guidelines which this year are to support initiatives that build the governance, operational, technical and community engagement capacity of stations. You are most likely to receive support if you are undertaking or planning activities that meet those objectives. That said, if funding support to this level is a priority for your station, you can certainly explain that in a grant application for assessor consideration.

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Content grants

What is content production?

The application form asks a series of questions about the number of people involved in content production at your organisation. We define content production as people contributing to media content across all platforms. This might include: presenters, producers, segment contributors, social media publishers, photographers, television crew… The people involved will vary depending on your organisation, so have a think about all of the platforms your organisation broadcasts through (tv, radio, online, social media) and who makes various components of that content.

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Are some activities prioritised over others?

Yes. This year we are particularly looking to support projects that increase community participation and diversity in community broadcasting and/or support high quality and creative content production. Your content project doesn’t have to do both of these things, but if it does need to address at least one of them or it is unlikely to be funded. These category objectives may change from round to round to respond to sector needs.

Some prioritisation of activities is expected to depend on available funds for certain activities, as defined by CBF funding providers. See What funding is available?

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What funding is available?

The Department of Communications and Arts allocates funds to the CBF to support some particular activities.

There are dedicated funds to support:

  • Ethnic broadcasting
  • RPH broadcasting
  • Indigenous broadcasting
  • General content

There are specific funds available to support specialist radio programming in Content grants. Ethnic, RPH and Indigenous broadcasting funds may also be allocated to support other activities relevant to those broadcast groups or audiences. Funds available for general content may be allocated for any content purpose.

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Why do you want our Strategic Plan in a Content grant application?

Strategic or future plans help assessors understand the overall goals of the station and hopefully, where your content projects connect with that plan. For example, if your station has identified attracting youth announcers as a priority over the next 3 years, your request for an outside broadcast at the local high school can be understood in the greater context of what the station is trying to achieve.

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What do the stages in the project timeline mean?

The project timeline table asks you to identify the when, what, how and who of your project plan.

A dropdown list of potential stages is provided to help guide this process. Below is an explanation of what we mean by each of the stages:

Already completed – things you have done prior to this application, eg. researched equipment options, met with project partners, had an initial meeting with participating broadcasters, gained approval for project site access.

Planning - things you still need to do before this project can begin, eg. finalise OB team, purchase zoom recorder, set up interview times, purchasing music.

Production – this describes creating the program content, eg. finalise running sheet, pre-record content, script-writing, researching.

Post production – finalising any pre-recorded content ahead of the broadcast, eg. editing, recording voiceovers, promotion of proposed broadcast time.

Broadcast – when will the content be broadcast? How and when can audiences access your content? This will vary from project to project depending on whether the content is a one-off project, a series, or a regular program rebroadcast on a national platform. What we want to know here is when it’s happening, on which platform and how people can interact with your content.

Evaluation – things you will do after the project is completed to establish whether it was a success or not, eg. collect feedback from participants, sample audience feedback via social media, track the number of calls received during the program, collect information on any stations rebroadcasting content.

Other - does something about your project plan not fit into the definitions above? Use the ‘other’ option and make sure the activity is described in detail in the next column over.

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Can I apply for wages under Content grants?

It depends on the type of wage. There are generally two types of salaried roles that relate to the production of content.

The first type relates to people who work across a number of programs within the station, such as Program Managers, Interview Coordinators or Content Engagement Officers. These roles are viewed as station salary positions and funding requests for these types of positions should be applied for under Development & Operations grants. These types of salaries are seen as part of the operational expenses of the station.

However, if the wage is specific to a particular program or content project you can request support for it as part of your Content grant application and included in your project budget for that particular show, series or project. Project-specific content wages include presenter or producer fees for an individual program, technician fees for a particular outside broadcast, expertise the station needs to pay for to carry out a particular content project.  You can apply for support towards these types of wages or costs involved in creating an individual program or content project within the project details section of your Content grant application.

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My proposal is for a new program, do I have to provide a demo or pilot?

Your application will be stronger if you provide a demo or pilot. If you can provide a pilot of the program, it will help assessors get a clearer idea of the style of program you’re expecting to create. At the least, if you can provide an example of previous work it will help demonstrate your capacity to create quality programming.

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Support for Specialist Radio Programming

What activities are being incentivised?

The CBF is always seeking to increase the diversity of voices in community media and to ensure that community radio reflects the whole community. The Department of Communications and Arts allocates funds to the CBF specific to this purpose to encourage programming that services the information needs of particular audiences, namely people with a print disability, and Ethnic and Indigenous communities.

Specialist Radio Programming support maintains diversity in community broadcasting through supporting the production of ongoing, regular ethnic, Indigenous and RPH programs. This support incentivises the production of those programs through the provision of funding for those purposes.

In particular, these grants help organisations extend their broadcasting activities beyond weekly music programs. Through the eligibility requirements, these grants incentivise spoken word content broadcast in a language other than English, content that meets the Protocols for RPH broadcasting, programs produced in and broadcast to remote Indigenous communities and increased levels of Indigenous and ethnic programs on ‘generalist’ licensed stations (as different to specialist ethnic or Indigenous licensed stations).

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What is the community / broadcaster engagement / admin fee?

Collecting information about what each ethnic and/or Indigenous program needs will take some work. As will holding consultation meetings with each broadcast group to make sure all parties are aware of the proposed grant expenditure and how the organisation plans to administer the grant funds. Those conversations and meetings are a requirement of the grant application. Broadcasters must know what is being requested on their behalf, must be aware that any equipment purchased with CBF grant funds remains the property of the applicant organisation (not the individual broadcaster) and must agree to the amounts being submitted in the grant budget. We are aware that this will take some time and resources, so we have allowed a contribution to the station of up to $250 per program to cover some of those expenses and staff time.

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How much should we apply for on behalf of our Specialist Program groups?

There is no set limit on the total amount you can request for Specialist Radio Programming support.

The grant guidelines include a guide for how much may be considered reasonable per program and per station for particular items such as music, program marketing, small equipment, and so on.

The best starting point is to look at what your station has spent on Ethnic Programs and Indigenous Programs grants previously.  Ask the broadcast groups what resources they need to continue and improve their programs.  Hand out the Items Requested forms we have created to help guide your discussions with the program groups and go through it with the broadcasters in the group (available for download below).  Your station may set limits or internal policies relating to some items (e.g. no local travel, only one conference attendance subsidy per group, one portable recorder to be shared by five program groups, etc.).

Downloads:

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Should the figures given in the guide for how much to apply for section of the Support for Specialist Radio Programming guidelines be regarded as caps?

No.  There is no set limit on the amounts you can request.

The guide describes how much the CBF considers to be a reasonable request for particular items per program and per station.  If your programs have a greater need for support than what is described in the guide, you can apply for more than what is stated in the guide.  For example, new program groups are likely to have a strong case for a higher support level during their first year.

We included this guide based on feedback we received on the draft guidelines. Some people felt that it was very difficult to apply for program requirements without any indication of what the CBF would think is a reasonable request. 

We designed the guide by calculating what we are likely to be able to fund if eligible specialist programming continues at a similar level across the sector to that in 2016/17.

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Do I have to provide a budget for each Specialist Radio program?

No. You should provide an aggregated budget for all programs by specialist program type. So all of your ethnic programs will be described in one budget (e.g. music for 32 programs, 3 x headphones to share between 5 program groups) and all of your Indigenous programs would be described in a separate budget as a collective (i.e. music for 2 programs, consultation with 2 x program groups).

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How will specialist radio programming requests be assessed?

Specialist radio programming requests are not given an assessment score like other content projects as funding to support ethnic, Indigenous and RPH programming is non-competitive. Your application will be assessed for eligibility to ensure the program/s is eligible under the grant guidelines. Assessors may provide comment on the items or amounts for items requested in your budget for the consideration of the Content Grants Advisory Committee. Grant offers may be adjusted depending on this eligibility and budget level assessment.

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Definitions

The application asks me to attach an Annual Report and financial statements – what does this mean?

An Annual Report is a document in which the organisation tells its members about who was on the board/committee of management and what was accomplished during the year.  The report should also include the annual financial statements.  Typically this would include a Statement of Income (previously called a Profit & Loss), a Statement of Financial Position (Balance Sheet) and a Statement of changes in net worth (Cash Flow Statement).  The CBF prefers but does not require that financial statements provided with a grant application are prepared by an auditor.  If your state or national regulatory authority (e.g. Consumer Affairs Victoria, NSW Fair Trading) does not require you to submit audited statements to them, we will accept the unaudited annual financial statements approved at your annual general meeting. 

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What is an Organisational Chart?

An organisational chart is usually a graphic representation of the structure of your organisation. Ideally, it would describe which roles are paid and which are voluntary.

Here’s an example:

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What is meant by a strategic plan or Business Plan?

These terms describe planning documents developed by your organisation to guide future activities.

A Strategic Plan would usually define the values and objectives of the organisation and outline achievable goals to meet those objectives over a defined timeframe (eg. 3-5 years).

A Business Plan is usually focused on the financial development of the organisation, outlining in detail how the organisation will meet its goals from a marketing, financial and operational perspective.

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What does building capacity mean?

Building capacity essentially means 'what do you need to do to make your organisation better'? This can relate to governance, operations, technical capacity, community engagement.

Some examples of capacity building include:

  • Developing your capacity to broadcast at level you’re licensed for through ACMA. This might mean getting a stronger transmitter so your signal reaches more of your allowable broadcast footprint.
  • Developing your operational capacity and financial sustainability through creating resources to help your sponsorship personnel approach potential sponsors.
  • Seeking technical advice on your software systems to develop a membership database.
  • Reaching out to local community groups to start engaging them with your organisation.
  • Projects to develop the financial literacy skills of your Board members, such as accessing resources on the Our Community website.

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Previous Grant categories

I used to apply for a Transmission Operational Subsidy every year.  What do I apply for now?

Apply for a Development & Operations grant, and provide details about your transmission costs.  These costs are no longer paid retrospectively.  Transmission operational expenses don't usually vary significantly from year to year, so you can base you request for funding support on previously based bills to estimate future running costs.  Note that there is dedicated funding available to support the costs of transmission.

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I used to apply for Ethnic, Indigenous or RPH program grants.  What do I apply for now?

You will need to complete a Content grant application and fill out the specialist radio programming section of the application. This is a consolidated application process for all Indigenous, RPH and Ethnic program support.

For stations that used to support their station operations through using part of their Ethnic Program grant, you will apply for a Development & Operations grant for support for your operations, and a Content grant with details about your specialist radio programming for support to cover the costs of making the programs.

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Other

Where can I get more information?

The CBF publishes a range of policy documents to explain various processes within the Foundation.

Other relevant pages of our website:

You can call a Grants Administrator to ask questions during office hours on 03 8341 5900.

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